Earthquake Visualization Tools – Earthquake Mapping

In the US earthquake data comes from the USGS (ww.usgs.gov), which works closely with universities and other organizations worldwide to collect accurate seismic information and translate it into earthquake event data. Their Shakemap Website (https://earthquake.usgs.gov/data/shakemap/) and Earthquake map site (https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/map/) are great sources of information, and the earthquake map lets you click down to detailed information on an event.

But for portability it is hard to beat mobile devices, and mobile apps like Earthquake Alert, Earthquake, Earthquake from the Red Cross, and Quakefeed are all excellent sources of near real-time earthquake information. Most mobile apps will post a notification of earthquakes that meet your criteria, such as intensity or location. But be careful not to set the alert threshold too low, the National Earthquake Center identifies between 12,000-14,000 each year (https://www.iris.edu/hq/inclass/fact-sheet/how_often_do_earthquakes_occur).